Georgetown University Southwest Quadrangle

A Unique Upperclassmen Experience
Location: 
Washington, D.C.
Client: 
The Georgetown University
Architect: 
EYP
Additional collaborations with EYP:
Contract Value: 
$146,000,000
Size: 
860,000 Square Feet
Year Completed: 
2003
Expertise: 

The Georgetown University Southwest Quadrangle project is a mixed-use project, located in the middle of a busy urban college campus. The project is comprised of five different buildings and occupies four levels below grade and eight levels above.

The Southwest Quadrangle houses a student residence hall, campus dining hall, and Jesuit residence hall. All five buildings are incorporated into one large structure that includes a four-level, 780 spot parking garage with a bus maintenance facility. The use of post-tensioned cables allows the building to have six-and-a-half-inch decks throughout the majority of the structure. With a three-and-a-half acre footprint, the structure holds 50,000 cubic yards of concrete and 8.5 million pounds of reinforcing steel.

A spectacular stone wall winds along the south end Georgetown’s campus. Comprised of three different types of rubble stone, the wall stretches approximately 150 feet from the edge of the Southwest Quadrangle to the University’s Canal Street entrance, masking the quad’s new parking garage and bus maintenance facility. At its lowest point, the wall measures only four feet tall but stretches to a height of 25 feet as it gradually makes its way south toward Canal Street. 

The dining hall’s oak millwork is one of the many exceptional finishes in the new facility. It includes a honey-colored, white oak trim that laces the floor, door frames and window sills of the building’s main dining room. Additionally, decorative rosette accent pieces are placed throughout.

Awards: 
ACI Award of Excellence
D.C. Subcontractors Association Outstanding Job Supervision & Project Management
WBC Craftsmanship Award - Cast-in-Place Concrete
WBC Craftsmanship Award - Sitework/Underpinning, Foundations, Excavation